Fruit News

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Fruit Newsletter for Week 14, October 8th – 12th, 2019

For shareholders with a fruit share, here is the seventh fruit newsletter of the 2019 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

I would like to take a moment to thank you for being a part of FruitShare.  We are honored to have your support and we do everything possible to find the best tasting organic fruit and deliver it to you, just days from harvest. Every day I try to pause and reflect and express my gratitude to my family, friends, co-workers and those I come in contact throughout the day. I’m not always successful, but when my focus and intention is on gratitude I know my day will be a great one. 

Please know that we are here to support you in expressing your thanks and gratitude to those who make a difference in your life.   gain, thanks for your support of organic growers. Only through increased organic acreage can we reduce the amount of chemicals used in our farming systems and improve the health of the planet.

If you want to order straight packs of Honeycrisp apples we have them on our website as straight packs in various sized boxes.

 

Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box:  Colorado peaches, Honeycrisp and Granny Smith apples, Bosc, D’Anjou and Bartlett pears

Storage and Ripening
Today’s Colorado peach I find only need 1-2 days on the counter.  They should be very juicy when ready. They can be stored in the refrigerator once they give to thumb pressure to enjoy them over a longer period of time.   These Bosc, D’Anjou and Bartlett pears are the first harvest of the season. Keep the Bartlett pears on the counter. They will be ready to eat when they give to thumb pressure near the stem “check the neck”. Your Bartlett pears will take between 4-7 days to give to thumb pressure by the stem and then enjoy them.  Bartlett’s will turn yellow as a sign of being ready to eat and at their juiciest. To speed up their ripening process you can place some in a paper bag with a banana, but remember to check them every day. The banana gives off naturally, ethylene gas that ripens fruit faster. Once the pears give to thumb pressure you can place them in the refrigerator to enjoy them over a longer period of time.  Bosc and D’Anjou pears will not change color as much but will be best when they give to thumb pressure near the stem. These new crop first picking Honeycrisp and Granny Smith apples are ready to eat. Keep them in the coldest part of your refrigerator to keep them crisp longer.  

What It Takes
Honeycrisp apples always a favorite.   We should have these consistently for the next 4 weeks. David Bedford of the University of Minnesota developed the Honeycrisp apples with good old fashioned cross breeding over 20 years ago.  It is the most popular apple we know of for eating fresh. It’s crisp sweet and tart combination along with the juicy crunch makes it a favorite. Bedford says that studied under an electron microscope, Honeycrisp cells are twice the size of other apples, which accounts for their unique, pleasing texture.  The cells fill up with natural sugar water which makes them delicious even to the core. We try to get you as many Honeycrisp as we can every year, but they are always limited and their season is short so enjoy them while they last. If you want more we do sell them by the straight box as well. They are great for eating out of hand but if you’re so inclined they make fantastic applesauce too.  Keep all your apples in the coolest part of your refrigerator to keep them crisp.

This week’s Honeycrisp and Granny Smith apples and Bosc, D’Anjou and Bartlett pears are from the Stennes family.  Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. 

We are now enjoying these late season Colorado Peaches from Brant and Carol. Eat these quickly they are tree ripe and will be ready to eat when you get them or within just a day or two.  They are delicious alone or sliced and served with any breakfast, cereal, waffles, pancakes. If they are getting too soft for you, wash the peach fuzz off of them, then slice them off the pit and put them in a freezer bag.  We like to use these frozen peaches in a smoothie. They are also great for baking and grilling. Enjoy!

Health and Wellness
Several recent studies are proving what we should already know: exercising is good for the brain – not just your body.  Recent research presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress show the brain-boosting effects of just four months of exercise. “It’s reassuring to know that you can at least partially prevent that [cognitive] decline by exercising and losing weight,” study researcher Dr. Martin Juneau, director of prevention of the Montreal Heart Institute, said in a statement. The study included overweight and sedentary adults with an average age of 49. They underwent twice-weekly sessions of intense interval training for four weeks, which included circuit weights and exercise bikes, before and after which they underwent tests of their cognitive functioning, cardiac output, body composition and exercise tolerance and capacity.  By the end of the study, the researchers found that not only were the participants’ body measurements all improved, but they also did better on the tests of cognitive functioning. “At least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week can make a huge difference to manage risk factors for heart disease and stroke,” Dr. Beth Abramson, spokesperson for the Heart and Stroke Foundation, said in a statement. Think about it. 150 minutes per week equates to about 20 minutes of exercise a day to see real benefits.  There are many benefits of exercise. We know it can make us feel better. These studies suggest it can make us think better as well. Courtesy of huffingtonpost.com

Recipe

Roasted Beet Pear and Walnut Salad serves 3-4 sides, recipe courtesy of Jeanine Donofrio from Camillestyles.com blog

  • 3 medium-sized beets, any variety (I used a mix of red and golden beets)
  • a small drizzle of olive oil, for roasting the beets
  • 1 ripe pear, chopped into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup walnuts, toasted
  • 1/4 cup feta cheese, crumbled (or more)
  • a few handfuls of salad greens of your choice
  • 1/4-1/2 cup cooked quinoa (optional, for a heartier salad)
  • micro sprouts, for garnish (also optional)
  • 1-2 tablespoons walnut oil
  • a drizzle of balsamic vinegar
  • a drizzle of honey
  • salt & pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Roast the beets by drizzling them with a bit of olive oil, some salt, and pepper, and wrapping them in foil. Depending on the size and freshness of your beets, they should take from 40 minutes to 1 hour to roast in the oven. Check occasionally, when they are fork-tender they are done. Set them aside to cool… as soon as they’re cool enough to touch, run them under the faucet and slide off the skins with your hands. Chop into roughly 1/2 inch cubes and set them aside to cool completely. (To save time, I suggest doing this up to one day ahead of time and popping them in the fridge until you’re ready to assemble the salad).  Assemble all salad ingredients on a platter. Drizzle with a liberal amount of walnut oil, a bit of balsamic vinegar, a little honey, and some salt and pepper. (or for a cleaner look, toss the balsamic only with the red beets, before assembling the salad).    

 

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Fruit Newsletter for Week 12, September 24th – 28th, 2019

For shareholders with a fruit share, here is the sixth fruit newsletter of the 2019 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

While walking in the prairie we planted at the farm 20 years ago a visitor asked me what I think is the cause of honey bee population decline. First of all, it is always nice to know more and more people are becoming aware of the decline in important pollinators in nature. I’ve spent a lot of time walking in orchards and row cropped fields.  What I know is organic agriculture promotes healthy soils, healthy plants, healthy ecosystems and healthy people. Organic fields are teaming with life and biodiversity which help grow the healthiest and tastiest food.  

 In contrast, greenhouses are spraying insecticides on bedding plants in winter and spring. These same plants we plant around our houses in the late spring.  Bee populations are most vulnerable during this time and when they go to get pollen from these toxic flowers they just bring the toxins back to their hives. I believe this is just one cause of the honey bee decline. There are many more cases just like this that affect bee populations.  Just think how the chemicals we’ve introduced into our food system, homes, yards, workplaces, and even fabrics might be affecting other parts of the life cycle. This is just one more reason FruitShare fruit is always organic.

If you want to order straight packs of Honeycrisp apples or Colorado peaches we have them on our website as straight packs in various sized boxes.

 

Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box:  Colorado peaches, Honeycrisp apples, Seedless grapes and Bartlett pears

 Storage and Ripening
Today’s Colorado peach I find only need 1-2 days on the counter.  They should be very juicy when ready. They can be stored in the refrigerator once they give to thumb pressure to enjoy them over a longer period of time.   These Bartlett pears are the first harvest of the season. Keep the Bartlett pears on the counter. They will be ready to eat when they give to thumb pressure near the stem “check the neck”. Your Bartlett pears will take between 4-7 days to give to thumb pressure by the stem and then enjoy them.  Bartlett’s will turn yellow as a sign of being ready to eat and at their juiciest. To speed up their ripening process you can place some in a paper bag with a banana, but remember to check them every day. The banana gives off naturally, ethylene gas that ripens fruit faster. Once the pears give to thumb pressure you can place them in the refrigerator to enjoy them over a longer period of time.  Grapes are more delicate and should be refrigerated and enjoyed first. Only wash your grapes before eating them as moisture can lead to mold. Sometimes a split grape will create extra moisture in the bag and cause a spot of mold. If this happens, take them out of the bag immediately, remove the fruit that caused the issue, and wash the remaining fruit. Dry the fruit off by placing it on a paper towel and then refrigerate it again.  These new crop first picking Honeycrisp apples are ready to eat. Keep them in the coldest part of your refrigerator to keep them crisp longer. We are nearing the end of the Colorado peach season, so if you want to enjoy some in the winter months we like to wash them and then slice them and place them on a cookie sheet in the freezer. Once frozen you can put them in a container in the freezer and they won’t stick to one another. 

What It Takes
Honeycrisp apples always a favorite.   We should have these consistently for the next 4 weeks. David Bedford of the University of Minnesota developed the Honeycrisp apples with good old fashioned cross breeding over 20 years ago.  It is the most popular apple we know of for eating fresh. It’s crisp sweet and tart combination along with the juicy crunch makes it a favorite. Bedford says that studied under an electron microscope, Honeycrisp cells are twice the size of other apples, which accounts for their unique, pleasing texture.  The cells fill up with natural sugar water which makes them delicious even to the core. We try to get you as many Honeycrisp as we can every year, but they are always limited and their season is short so enjoy them while they last. If you want more we do sell them by the straight box as well. They are great for eating out of hand but if you’re so inclined they make fantastic applesauce too.  Keep all your apples in the coolest part of your refrigerator to keep them crisp.

This week’s Honeycrisp apples and Bartlett pears are from the Stennes family.  Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. 

We are now enjoying these late season Colorado Peaches from Brant and Carol. Eat these quickly they are tree ripe and will be ready to eat when you get them or within just a day or two.  They are delicious alone or sliced and served with any breakfast, cereal, waffles, pancakes. If they are getting too soft for you, wash the peach fuzz off of them, then slice them off the pit and put them in a freezer bag.  We like to use these frozen peaches in a smoothie. They are also great for baking and grilling. Enjoy!

Health and Wellness
Great news! Eating the apples and pears in your box this week could help decrease your risk for type 2 diabetes – especially for women. It is known that certain antioxidants called flavonoids can help improve insulin sensitivity. There are three types of flavonoids that scientists are particularly interested in, and pears include two of them. While eating these antioxidants has been connected to decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in both men and women, a new analysis of the Nurses’ Health Study shows that the combination of flavonoids in apples and pears has the most consistent association with lower risk of diabetes. So dig in. This week’s box might as well be called the Flavonoid Box.

Recipe

Jen’s Kale Slaw with Pears and Avocado (My wife’s friend Jennifer Holloway developed this recipe and it is a winner!)

2 bunches of kale stripped off the stem—roughly chopped and lightly steamed (then chopped finer)

2 carrots grated

1 cup shredded cabbage (red or nappa)

½ red onion chopped (soaked to take away strong flavor)

1 pear sliced/chopped

1 avocado diced

Dressing—mix separately first

1 T Dijon Mustard, 3 T Olive Oil, 2-3 T Apple Cider Vinegar (white, or champagne will also work).

Combine above ingredients and enjoy.  You can also prep a larger batch of the kale/carrot/cabbage/onion and keep it in the fridge.  Adding pear, avocado, and dressing upon serving.

Grilled Peaches with Cardamom Sugar Crust

4 semi-ripe peaches cut in half and pit removed

6 tbl turbinado sugar

1 tbl ground cardamom

Toss the sugar and cardamom together in a bowl. Dip the peaches, flesh side down, into the sugar. Place on a medium/high heat grill and let them alone for approximately 7 minutes. You want the sugar to caramelize on the peaches and create a crust.

Serve with your favorite ice cream, creme fraiche or mascarpone.

Courtesy of foodily.com

 

 

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Fruit Newsletter for Week 10, September 10th – 14th, 2019

For shareholders with a fruit share, here is the fifth fruit newsletter of the 2019 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

 

Many of you may not be aware of the “Dirty Dozen” list of fruits.  These are conventional fruits that have many chemicals in and on them.  Pesticide residue testing by the U.S. Department of Agriculture has repeatedly found that fruits such as apples, grapes, nectarines, pears, and berries show chemical residue when tested and consistently rank in the top 5 with pesticide residue.  We only bring you organic fruit because of our focus on healthy people, healthy communities, and a healthy planet. Organic fruit is grown with a lot of knowledge and attention to detail – paying attention to nature’s cues – thus avoiding the use of toxic chemicals.  Enjoy your fruit knowing it is full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and flavor that will keep you strong and energized throughout your day.

 

Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

In Your Box:  Colorado peaches, Gala apples, Bartlett pears, and Seedless grapes

Storage and Ripening
Today’s Colorado peach I find only need 2 days on the counter.  They should be very juicy when ready. They can be stored in the refrigerator once they give to thumb pressure to enjoy them over a longer period of time.   These Bartlett pears are the first harvest of the season. Keep the Bartlett pears on the counter. They will be ready to eat when they give to thumb pressure near the stem “check the neck”. Your Bartlett pears will take between 4-7 days to give to thumb pressure by the stem and then enjoy them.  Bartlett’s will turn yellow as a sign of being ready to eat and at their juiciest. To speed up their ripening process you can place some in a paper bag with a banana, but remember to check them every day. The banana gives off naturally, ethylene gas that ripens fruit faster. Once the pears give to thumb pressure you can place them in the refrigerator to enjoy them over a longer period of time.  Grapes are more delicate and should be refrigerated and enjoyed first. Only wash your grapes before eating them as moisture can lead to mold. Sometimes a split grape will create extra moisture in the bag and cause a spot of mold. If this happens, take them out of the bag immediately, remove the fruit that caused the issue, and wash the remaining fruit. Dry the fruit off by placing it on a paper towel and then refrigerate it again.  These new crop first picking Gala apples are ready to eat. Keep them in the coldest part of your refrigerator to keep them crisp longer. We are nearing the end of the Colorado peach season, so if you want to enjoy some in the winter months we like to wash them and then slice them and place them on a cookie sheet in the freezer. Once frozen you can put them in a container in the freezer and they won’t stick to one another. 

What It Takes
This week’s Gala apples and Bartlett pears are from the Stennes family. Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894 when the Stennes family emigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, and plums.  

Brant and Carol bring us two of the mid-season peaches.  The Roza and Gleason varieties are a couple of Brant’s favorites and he was very excited that he could get these to us this year.  At their orchard on the western slopes of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, it is a family affair. The whole family including their sons, parents, and nephews, work side by side to grow these excellent peaches.  The mountainous location and unique climate of their farm make it perfect for growing delicious peaches. At almost 4800 ft. in elevation, the orchard’s water supply comes from melting snowpack high in the Rockies. The hot days and cool nights in their river valley bring the peaches to the peak of flavor and juiciness.  Eat these quickly they are tree-ripe and will be ready to eat when you get them or within just a day or two. They are delicious alone or sliced and served with any breakfast, cereal, waffles, pancakes. If they are getting too soft for you, wash the peach fuzz off of them, then slice them off the pit and put them in a freezer bag.  We like to use these frozen peaches in a smoothie. They are also great for baking and grilling. Enjoy!

Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni Soghomonian, is famous for their grapes. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old and are still producing grapes!  

Health and Wellness
With back to school and family schedule changes, this is a great time of year to start building good habits around snacks. Send your kids to school with fresh fruit in their lunches every day. Have fruit at sports events and ice cold water with a teaspoon of salt (for electrolytes).  Fruit is filling and nutritious and will help them stay focused throughout the day. A good tip is to include the tougher fruit in lunch boxes because it will hold up better until lunch time. If you want to send softer fruit like peaches and grapes, make sure to put them in a hard-sided container with some paper towels for padding and clean up. 

Recipe

Grilled Peaches with Cardamom Sugar Crust

4 semi-ripe peaches cut in half and pit removed

6 tbl turbinado sugar

1 tbl ground cardamom

Toss the sugar and cardamom together in a bowl. Dip the peaches, flesh side down, into the sugar. Place on a medium/high heat grill and let them alone for approximately 7 minutes. You want the sugar to caramelize on the peaches and create a crust.

Serve with your favorite ice cream, creme fraiche or mascarpone.

Courtesy of foodily.com

Peach Buckle

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened, plus more for skillet

3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar

3 large eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour (spooned and leveled)

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 pounds peaches, pitted, peeled, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (4 cups)

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/3 cup sliced almonds

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 10-inch cast-iron skillet, 9-inch square baking pan, or 2-quart shallow baking dish. In a large bowl, cream butter, and 3/4 cup sugar with an electric mixer until fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, and vanilla; beat to combine. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. With a mixer on low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture; beat until incorporated. Fold in peaches. Spread batter in prepared skillet. In a small bowl, mix together remaining 2 tablespoons sugar, cinnamon, and almonds. Sprinkle mixture over top; bake until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean and topping is golden, 45 to 50 minutes. Let cool 20 minutes before serving.

Courtesy of marthastewart.com


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Fruit Newsletter for Week 8, August 27th – 31st, 2019

For shareholders with a fruit share, here is the fourth fruit newsletter of the 2019 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

 

We’ve all heard that obesity in the U.S. is at an all-time high and increasing, especially in children. Experts agree that we eat too much sugar, which is contributing to this phenomenon. So, if we’re eating too much sugar, does that mean that we need to be concerned about the sugar in fruit? An article in the New York Times explains that “sugar consumed in fruit is not linked to any adverse health effects, no matter how much you eat.” In fact, the article continues, “increased fruit consumption is tied to lower body weight and a lower risk of obesity-associated diseases.”

Why is that? It all comes down to fiber. Because sugars are contained within fruit cells, “it takes time for the digestive tract to break down those cells. The sugars therefore enter the bloodstream slowly, giving the liver more time to metabolize them.” That means your blood sugar doesn’t spike, and your body works to break down fruit slowly, so that you feel satisfied, longer. Need proof? “Unlike processed foods, which are usually digested in the first few feet of our intestines, fiber-rich fruit breaks down more slowly so it travels far longer through the digestive tract, triggering the satiety hormones that tend to cluster further down the small intestines,” according to Dr. David Ludwig, the director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Type this link into your browser to read the full article and find out more about why eating fruit and vegetables is truly one of the best things you can eat for a healthy diet, healthy weight and healthy life! http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2013/07/31/making-the-case-for-eating-fruit/?hpw=&

– Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 In Your Box:  Liberty blueberries, Flavor Grenade or Flavor King Pluots, Ivory green grapes and Colorado peaches. Enjoy!

Storage and Ripening
Keep all of the fruit in the refrigerator.  Grapes and blueberries, are more delicate and should be refrigerated and enjoyed first. Only wash your grapes and blueberries before eating them as moisture can lead to mold. Sometimes a split blueberry, grape or cherry will create extra moisture in the bag or clamshell and cause a spot of mold. If this happens, take them out of the bag immediately, remove the fruit that caused the issue, and wash the remaining fruit. Dry the fruit off by placing it on a paper towel and then refrigerate it again.  Peaches and pluots will be ready to eat when the flesh gives to gentle thumb pressure. We have been finding these peaches and pluots can go directly into the fridge. They should be ready to eat on arrival or shortly thereafter. Just keep an eye on them. The peaches are juiciest when they give to slight thumb pressure. You can also slice and freeze peaches, as well as blueberries and grapes. After they are frozen, we like to use them in smoothies, no sugar necessary because they are so sweet on their own.  

What It Takes
These delicious Colorado peaches are from Brant and Carol.  They are firm in their commitment to good land stewardship. At their orchard on the western slopes of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, it is a family affair. The whole family including their sons, parents and nephews, work side by side to grow these excellent peaches.  The mountainous location and unique climate of their farm make it perfect for growing delicious peaches. At almost 4800 ft. in elevation, the orchard’s water supply comes from melting snowpack high in the Rockies. The hot days and cool nights in their river valley bring the peaches to the peak of flavor and juiciness.  Eat these quickly they are tree ripe and will be ready to eat when you get them or within just a day or two. They are delicious alone or sliced and served with any breakfast, cereal, waffles, pancakes. If they are getting too soft for you, wash the peach fuzz off of them, then slice them off the pit and put them in a freezer bag.  We like to use these frozen peaches in a smoothie. They are also great for baking and grilling.

What is a pluot? The pluot is a fruit that has revolutionized the plum world.  It was developed by the famous plant breeder Floyd Zaiger of Modesto, CA.  Floyd crossed plums with apricots to come up with the great tasting and beautiful pluot.  The pluot is made up of 70-75% plum and 25-30% apricot. Over the years many different variations of the pluot have been grown.  These pluots are from Cecelia at Wild River. Located on the banks of the Yuba River in California, exceptional fruit has been grown at Wild River since 1979. Enjoy these Flavor Grenade or Flavor King pluots! 

The Liberty blueberry grown by Glacial Fed Organics is a late season variety.  This isn’t as crisp and “poppy” as the Dukes and Drapers, but it has a complex jammy sweet flavor that is delicious fresh or combined in a pie, crisp or crumble with Colorado peaches.

Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni Soghomonian, is famous for their grapes. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old and are still producing grapes! These Ivory green grapes some people think are as sweet as cotton candy.

Health and Wellness
A recent article in the New York Times states running can add years to your life.  Here is the link https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/12/well/move/an-hour-of-running-may-add-seven-hours-to-your-life.html

The best part is if you ran for just 5 minutes it would give you greater longevity.  “Perhaps most interesting, the researchers calculated that, hour for hour, running statistically returns more time to people’s lives than it consumes. Figuring two hours per week of training, since that was the average reported by runners in the Cooper Institute study, the researchers estimated that a typical runner would spend less than six months actually running over the course of almost 40 years, but could expect an increase in life expectancy of 3.2 years, for a net gain of about 2.8 years.”  This research continues to show that moving your body is good for you. Get up and walk 5 minutes each hour and at some point during the day try to pick up the pace to a fast walk, jog or run. I have made it a habit to wake up early and run in the mornings. It gets my day started right and I tend to feel better and eat healthier throughout the day. Give it a try and let me know what you think.

Recipe

Colorado Peach Ice Cream (A summer treat to beat the heat)

  • 6 ripe organic Colorado peaches
  • 2/3  cup sugar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 quart heavy cream
  • 1 cap of vanilla extract)

First, Wash peaches thoroughly and peel peaches over a large bowl to catch the juice. Halve and pit them and chop roughly. Place in the bowl and sprinkle with 1/3 cup of sugar, the salt and lemon juice and let them sit for 30 minutes. Second, If you have a blender, take the peach peels and blend until smooth.  This is a break from tradition but peach peels have lots of the nutrition so we hate to omit these! Add to peach mixture. Third, While peaches macerate, put cream and remaining sugar in saucepan with vanilla. Heat over medium-low heat, stirring frequently to keep from scorching, until the sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and cool. Fourth, Pour cream over peaches and mix thoroughly. Taste to see if it needs more sugar. (This will depend on the peaches.) Refrigerate until chilled. Fifth, Pour the mixture into an ice-cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer’s directions until set but not quite hard. (If serving immediately, freeze harder.) Scoop and serve!

 

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Fruit Newsletter for August 13th – 17th, 2019

For shareholders with a fruit share, here is the third fruit newsletter of the 2019 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

 

I am fortunate to work directly with so many fantastic fruit growers.  Many are 3rd, 4th and even 5th generation growers who grew up on the farms they currently work and who have a direct connection with their customers.  With my many visits to orchards, I am always struck by each grower’s attention to detail.  They give much thought and care into producing the best tasting organic fruit all the while maintaining their concern for the environment, their employees, and their customers.  Thank you so much for your support of organic agriculture.

                                                                     

Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box: All Organic Fruit, Blueberries, Red seedless grapes, Yellow peaches and nectarines, and Dapple Dandy pluots

Storage and Ripening
I like to place the Peaches and Nectarines on the counter until they give to thumb pressure. Once the peaches and nectarines give to thumb pressure eat them right away or place them in your refrigerator to enjoy within a couple of days.  Sometimes stone fruit will develop a soft spot early in the ripening process.  If this happens cut the spot out and eat it right away.  Eat blueberries first and place any left-over in the refrigerator right away.  They like to be cool and dry.  Make sure to dry off any condensation they may have picked up during the delivery and place them in the refrigerator.  The Red grapes should be kept in the coldest part of the refrigerator and enjoyed quickly too.  Pluots are best when they give to thumb pressure too, but they are also good firm so see how you like them the best.  The refrigerator will keep them longer.  

What It Takes
Three Sisters Farm, owned by Joe and Johnni Soghomonian, is famous for their grapes. Located near Fresno, CA, they use beneficial grasses and flowers – especially poppies – as cover crops, making their vineyard exceptionally beautiful. Three Sisters has been certified organic since 1981, but even before Joe and Johnni began farming, Joe’s parents owned the farm. Some of the vines are over 80 years old and are still producing grapes! 

The pluot  ¾ plum ¼ apricot was developed by California fruit hybridizer Floyd Zaiger, who also developed the aprium, an apricot plum hybrid.  Zaiger changed the apricot and plum fruit world with both these fruits.  They are firmer and sweeter typically than the apricot and plum are alone and we have really found they consistently taste great.  

John France began producing organic tree fruit in 1989, and quickly became well known for both the quality of the fruit and the quality of his operation. John is thankful that his three children are not exposed to pesticides and fungicides used heavily in conventional stone fruit orchards.  So what’s the secret to his exceptional organic fruit? Weeds. Or so it would seem – John says that what appear to be weeds are actually valuable cover crops. John strategically plants an assortment of grains and legumes between his trees. He explains that the legumes provide nitrogen when tilled under, and the grains create plant diversity, which John has found to be a crucial part of orchard health. The cover crops also house natural predators and make it easier for water to be absorbed into the soil. John has watched the health of his soil improve, and has seen insects and birds return to the orchard. Now raising 18 different types of fruit trees and vines, John has recently noticed increases in fruit production. So whether you say “tomayto” or “tomahto,” “weeds” or “cover crops,” you’re bound to enjoy these Dapple Dandy pluots and Nectarines from him.

Today’s peaches are first picking from Washington State and they should be delicious.  Coming soon Colorado peaches.  Everyone’s favorite!

These Draper blueberries are in their first picking which always produces great tasting berries that are large too. Enjoy!

Health and Wellness
Did you know that 1 in 3 people will develop cancer in their lifetime? That’s a big number. But did you know that there is an emerging movement to tackle cancer simply by eating the right kinds of foods? The idea is to “starve cancer” by eating healthy, flavorful foods that work against a process called angiogenesis, which is the way microscopic cancers gain blood supply. By eating to starve cancer, you can help prevent cancers from beginning to grow in your body. Some of the fruits that do work to stave off cancer include: apples; blueberries; cherries; cranberries; grapefruit; nectarines; oranges; peaches; plums; red grapes to name a few. Read more at www.eattodefeat.org.

Recipe
Looking for something simple for breakfast these days?  Make ahead breakfast oats might be just the thing.  Simply assemble ingredients, pour into mason jars, cover and refrigerate overnight.  In the morning add any fresh organic fruit, nuts or even dark chocolate and you are set for the day.  This recipe works with dairy or using dairy-free alternatives.  Sweeten naturally with added fruit include local honey or maple syrup.  What we love about this oats recipe is that like so many of our favorites, it can be so easily adapted to suit your dietary needs and wants and can change as fruits are in-season.  To reduce sugar stick with plain yogurt, and only sweeten to taste.

Combine in a bowl (makes 2):

1/2 cup greek full-fat yogurt or dairy-free cashew alternative.  Plain or vanilla preferred.

2/3 cup organic milk or milk substitute of your choice.  

1 T ground flax seed

1 T hemp hearts

1 T chia seeds

1-2 T maple syrup (optional) 

1/2 cup organic rolled oats (can find GF too)

Top with blueberries, sliced peaches and nectarines or, slivered almonds, walnuts, a few dark chocolate bits or dried banana chips.  If you are really in a time crunch, add toppings night before so you are ready to grab-n-go.  Thank you reciperunner for the inspiration.

 

Become a fan on Facebook (www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), pin us on Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/FruitShare), Instagram (www.instagram/fruitshare.com), we are blogging at (www.fruitshare.com/blogs/organic-fruit-blog) Good old-fashioned email works, too, at email hidden; JavaScript is required, or by phone at 651-644-2800

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Fruit Newsletter for July 30th – August 3rd, 2019

For shareholders with a fruit share, here is the second fruit newsletter of the 2019 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

I am fortunate to work directly with so many fantastic fruit growers.  Many are 3rd, 4th and even 5th generation growers who grew up on the farms they currently work and who have a direct connection with their customers.  With my many visits to orchards, I am always struck by each grower’s attention to detail. They give much thought and care into producing the best tasting organic fruit all the while maintaining their concern for the environment, their employees, and their customers.  Thank you so much for your support of organic agriculture.

 

Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box: All Organic Fruit  Blueberries, Sweetheart cherries, Yellow peaches and nectarines, Plums,  and Valencia oranges

Storage and Ripening
I like to place the Peaches and Nectarines on the counter until they give to thumb pressure. Once the peaches and nectarines give to thumb pressure eat them right away or place them in your refrigerator to enjoy within a couple of days.  Sometimes stone fruit will develop a soft spot early in the ripening process. If this happens cut the spot out and eat it right away. Eat blueberries first and place any left-over in the refrigerator right away. They like to be cool and dry.  Make sure to dry off any condensation they may have picked up during the delivery and place them in the refrigerator. The Sweetheart cherries should be kept in the coldest part of the refrigerator and enjoyed quickly too. Plums are best when they give to thumb pressure too, but they are also good firm so see how you like them the best.  The refrigerator will keep them longer. Valencia oranges will keep for at least 2 weeks in the refrigerator.  

What It Takes
Cherries are one of the most difficult fruit crops to grow.  All the harvesting happens in about a 2-week window. The weather has to cooperate perfectly for the fruit to be blemish-free.  Harvesting is all done by hand, color picking through the orchard several times to pick just what is sweet and ready to eat. Harvest days being at 4:30 AM when the temperatures are the coolest and then before noon everything comes into the packing shed is cooled down to 36 degrees F and packing goes on until 9 pm in refrigerated coolers.  Everyone gets up and does it all over again until the 2-week harvest is done. We are excited this year that we’ve been able to extend the season with Sweetheart cherries that are a later producing variety. We were able to get these precious and extremely limited supply of organic Sweetheart cherries to you from the Stennes family.

Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894 when the Stennes family emigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, and pears.  

Dick Kauffman finds organic farming much more satisfying than conventional methods. Dick and I share a history of having volunteered in the U.S. Peace Corps.  After years of farm management in the Napa area, Dick began his own orchard and switched over to organic growing methods in 1999. Now, he has 82 acres of delicious organic stone fruit, including the plums in your box.  

John France began producing organic tree fruit in 1989, and quickly became well known for both the quality of the fruit and the quality of his operation. John is thankful that his three children are not exposed to pesticides and fungicides used heavily in conventional stone fruit orchards.  So what’s the secret to his exceptional organic fruit? Weeds. Or so it would seem – John says that what appear to be weeds are actually valuable cover crops. John strategically plants an assortment of grains and legumes between his trees. He explains that the legumes provide nitrogen when tilled under, and the grains create plant diversity, which John has found to be a crucial part of orchard health. The cover crops also house natural predators and make it easier for water to be absorbed into the soil. John has watched the health of his soil improve, and has seen insects and birds return to the orchard. Now raising 18 different types of fruit trees and vines, John has recently noticed increases in fruit production. So whether you say “tomayto” or “tomahto,” “weeds” or “cover crops,” you’re bound to enjoy these Peaches and Nectarines.

These Draper blueberries are in their first picking which always produces great berries. Enjoy!

The Valencia oranges come from Bill. He has been working with several of his organic orchard friends since the 1980s to grow delicious citrus and avocados.  The Valencia oranges are super juicy and are perfect for squeezing a glass of fresh orange juice. Just cut them in half, cross-section, and squeeze the juice into a glass.  It is the perfect way to start the day. They also make a great snack but can be difficult to peel, so your best bet is to slice Valencia’s into wedges. They do have some seeds so watch out.

Health and Wellness
Cherries provide tremendous benefits to your health. They have a low glycemic index of 22 making them a great choice for diabetics. They also help you sleep better because they are a good source of melatonin. The Alzheimer’s Association includes cherries as one of the memory boosting foods because they are rich in antioxidants. Cherries provide cardiovascular benefits as well. The anthocyanins, which are the pigments giving cherries their red color, may activate PPAR which regulates genes involved in fat and glucose metabolism and thus, reduce risk factors for high cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes. Eating cherries lowers the risk of gout attacks by 35-50 percent. They can also help reduce muscle inflammation and pain, making them a great choice for those who suffer from osteoarthritis, as well as athletes pushing their bodies to the limit, like long-distance runners. Cherries are very high in potassium, which helps regulate heart rate and blood pressure and reduces the risk of hypertension. The phytosterols in cherries help reduce bad cholesterol levels. In other words, eat cherries – they taste great and are good for you. 

Recipe
Looking for something simple for breakfast these days?  Make ahead breakfast oats might be just the thing. Simply assemble ingredients, pour into mason jars, cover and refrigerate overnight.  In the morning add any fresh organic fruit, nuts or even dark chocolate and you are set for the day. This recipe works with dairy or using dairy-free alternatives.  Sweeten naturally with added fruit include local honey or maple syrup.  What we love about this oats recipe is that like so many of our favorites, it can be so easily adapted to suit your dietary needs and wants and can change as fruits are in-season.  To reduce sugar stick with plain yogurt, and only sweeten to taste.

Combine in a bowl (makes 2):

1/2 cup greek full-fat yogurt or dairy-free cashew alternative.  Plain or vanilla preferred.

2/3 cup organic milk or milk substitute of your choice.  

1 T ground flax seed

1 T hemp hearts

1 T chia seeds

1-2 T maple syrup (optional)

1/2 cup organic rolled oats (can find GF too)

Top with blueberries, sliced peaches and nectarines or  pitted organic cherries, slivered almonds, walnuts, a few dark chocolate bits or dried banana chips.  If you are really in a time crunch, add toppings night before so you are ready to grab-n-go. Thank you reciperunner for the inspiration.

Become a fan on Facebook (www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), pin us on Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/FruitShare), Instagram (www.instagram/fruitshare.com), we are blogging at (www.fruitshare.com/blogs/organic-fruit-blog) Good old-fashioned email works, too, at email hidden; JavaScript is required, or by phone at 651-644-2800

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Welcome to the First Fruit Delivery of 2019

Dear Angelic Organics shareholders with fruit shares, see below for the first fruit newsletter of the 2019 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

 

It is great to welcome our friends at Angelic Organics back for another season of delicious organic fruit.  This week’s box is truly an “antioxidant booster” because of all the superfoods inside! A superfood contains antioxidants, which help fight free radicals – cells that can cause diseases like cancer. As you may know, blueberries are known as the top superfood because they contain more antioxidants than 40 other fruits and veggies. You may not know that peaches and nectarines also contain lots of antioxidants along with nutrients and vitamins your body needs to stay healthy. These antioxidants often come as part of the molecules that give fruits their colors – so you know with blue blueberries, yellow peaches and nectarines, red cherries, apples and pluots providing a wide spectrum of colors, you’re getting lots of different types of antioxidants and nutrients.  We hope you had a terrific FOURTH OF JULY.                                                                         

 

Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

 

In Your Box: All Organic Fruit  Blueberries, Lapin cherries, Yellow peaches and nectarines, Pluots, Cripps apples, and Valencia oranges

Storage and Ripening
I like to place the Peaches and Nectarines on the counter until they give to thumb pressure. Once the peaches and nectarines give to thumb pressure eat them right away or place them in your refrigerator to enjoy within a couple of days.  Sometimes stone fruit will develop a soft spot early in the ripening process. If this happens cut the spot out and eat it right away. Eat blueberries first and place any left-over in the refrigerator right away. They like to be cool and dry.  Make sure to dry off any condensation they may have picked up during the delivery and place them in the refrigerator. The Lapin cherries should be kept in the coldest part of the refrigerator and enjoyed quickly too. Pluots are best when they give to thumb pressure too, but they are also good firm so see how you like them the best.  The refrigerator will keep them longer. Apples and Valencia oranges will keep for at least 2 weeks in the refrigerator.  

What It Takes
Cherries are one of the most difficult fruit crops to grow.  All the harvesting happens in about a 2-week window. The weather has to cooperate perfectly for the fruit to be blemish-free.  Harvesting is all done by hand, color picking through the orchard several times to pick just what is sweet and ready to eat. Harvest days being at 4:30 AM when the temperatures are the coolest and then before noon everything comes into the packing shed is cooled down to 36 degrees F and packing goes on until 9 pm in refrigerated coolers.  Everyone gets up and does it all over again until the 2-week harvest is done. There is no such thing as a weekend or 4th of July Holiday for the cherry producer. Some years a Lapin crop doesn’t even happen, so we are excited that we were able to get these precious and extremely limited supply of organic Lapin cherries to you from the Stennes family.

Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894 when the Stennes family emigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers. They have grown the orchard to include not just apples, but also cherries, pluots, plums, and pears.  

Dick Kauffman finds organic farming much more satisfying than conventional methods. Dick and I share a history of having volunteered in the U.S. Peace Corps.  After years of farm management in the Napa area, Dick began his own orchard and switched over to organic growing methods in 1999. Now, he has 82 acres of delicious organic stone fruit, including the pluots in your box.  The pluot ¾ plum ¼ apricot was developed by California fruit hybridizer Floyd Zaiger, who also developed the aprium, an apricot plum hybrid. Zaiger changed the apricot and plum fruit world with both these fruits. They are firmer and sweeter typically than the apricot and plum are alone and we have really found they consistently taste great. 

John France began producing organic tree fruit in 1989, and quickly became well known for both the quality of the fruit and the quality of his operation. John is thankful that his three children are not exposed to pesticides and fungicides used heavily in conventional stone fruit orchards.  So what’s the secret to his exceptional organic fruit? Weeds. Or so it would seem – John says that what appear to be weeds are actually valuable cover crops. John strategically plants an assortment of grains and legumes between his trees. He explains that the legumes provide nitrogen when tilled under, and the grains create plant diversity, which John has found to be a crucial part of orchard health. The cover crops also house natural predators and make it easier for water to be absorbed into the soil. John has watched the health of his soil improve, and has seen insects and birds return to the orchard. Now raising 18 different types of fruit trees and vines, John has recently noticed increases in fruit production. So whether you say “tomayto” or “tomahto,” “weeds” or “cover crops,” you’re bound to enjoy these Peaches and Nectarines.

These Duke blueberries are one of our favorite varieties.

The Valencia oranges come from Bill. He has been working with several of his organic orchard friends since the 1980s to grow delicious citrus and avocados.  The Valencia oranges are super juicy and are perfect for squeezing a glass of fresh orange juice. Just cut them in half, cross-section, and squeeze the juice into a glass.  It is the perfect way to start the day. They also make a great snack but can be difficult to peel, so your best bet is to slice Valencia’s into wedges. They do have some seeds so watch out.

Enjoy these new crop Pink Cripps apples.  

Health and Wellness
Cherries provide tremendous benefits to your health. They have a low glycemic index of 22 making them a great choice for diabetics. They also help you sleep better because they are a good source of melatonin. The Alzheimer’s Association includes cherries as one of the memory boosting foods because they are rich in antioxidants. Cherries provide cardiovascular benefits as well. The anthocyanins, which are the pigments giving cherries their red color, may activate PPAR which regulates genes involved in fat and glucose metabolism and thus, reduce risk factors for high cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes. Eating cherries lowers the risk of gout attacks by 35-50 percent. They can also help reduce muscle inflammation and pain, making them a great choice for those who suffer from osteoarthritis, as well as athletes pushing their bodies to the limit, like long-distance runners. Cherries are very high in potassium, which helps regulate heart rate and blood pressure and reduces the risk of hypertension. The phytosterols in cherries help reduce bad cholesterol levels. In other words, eat cherries – they taste great and are good for you. 

Recipe
This easy summer salad takes healthy clean-eating up to the next level.  Garden fresh arugula combined with nutty red quinoa and our freshest organic blueberries makes for a perfect summer dish.

Salad:  4 cups organic arugula (fresh cut from the garden is ideal!), 1 cup cooked organic quinoa, 1 organic yellow pepper—diced, 1 cup FruitShare fresh organic blueberries, 2-3 organic green onions, 1 handful of organic walnuts (optional)

Dressing:  1 shallot finely diced, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, 1/8 cup organic blueberries—muddled, salt/pepper, maple syrup to taste (the real stuff of course!)

Strain and rinse 1/2 cup red quinoa.  Add to saucepan with 1 cup water, bring to a boil, then cover and simmer until water has been absorbed.  Allow to cool or place in the fridge if time allows. Meanwhile, wash and spin arugula greens and place in a bowl.  Add diced yellow pepper, green onions, blueberries. Add quinoa and dress salad with blueberry vinaigrette dressing (below) or vinaigrette of your choice.  Enjoy fresh.

Blueberry Vinaigrette Dressing:  Mix oil and vinegar in an approximate 3 to 1 oil to vinegar ratio. Add shallot, muddled blueberries, salt, pepper and maple syrup to taste.  

 

Become a fan on Facebook (www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), pin us on Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/FruitShare), Instagram (www.instagram/fruitshare.com), we are blogging at (www.fruitshare.com/blogs/organic-fruit-blog) Good old-fashioned email works, too, at email hidden; JavaScript is required, or by phone at 651-644-2800

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Welcome to the Final Fruit Delivery of 2018

Fruit Newsletter for Extended Season Week 2, November 13th – 17th, 2018

Dear Angelic Organics shareholders with a fruit share, see below for the final fruit newsletter of the 2018 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

November Vol. 3 2018

I would like to take a moment to thank you for participating in FruitShare.   We are honored to have your support and we do everything possible to find the best tasting organic fruit and deliver it to you, just days from harvest.  Every day I try to pause and reflect and express my gratitude to my family, friends, co-workers and those I come in contact throughout the day. I’m not always successful, but when my focus and intention is on gratitude I know my day will be a great one.

Please know that at FruitShare we are here to support you in expressing your thanks and gratitude to those who make a difference in your life.  With Thanksgiving and the Holidays coming up, we are here to make your gift giving easier. Last year, Vegetarian Times magazine chose us as one of their top 5 food subscriptions to give for holiday gifts!  We would be honored to work with you for any gift giving that you may have coming up. If you have multiple gifts to send, we can easily upload your addresses from a spreadsheet and create gift cards to go along with your gifts.  If you are looking for the perfect gift this holiday, we will pack and deliver it for you anywhere in the lower 48 states! . . . Whatever the occasion, delicious organic fruit is about sharing your joy and gratitude and is in keeping with our mission of “Improving the Health of People, Communities and the Planet”.  Let me know how we can help and thanks again. We love having you as a customer and would be happy to help get organic fruit gifts and fruit subscriptions to those you care about.

 

Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

In Your Box: Organic Honeycrisp apples, Opal apples, and Pink Lady apples, Comice, and D’Anjou pears

Storage and Ripening
Your Honeycrisp, Opal, Pink Lady apples will keep for at least 2 weeks in the coldest part of your refrigerator.  Keep the Comice and D’Anjou pears on the counter. They will be ready to eat when they give to thumb pressure near the stem “check the neck”.  D’Anjou pears stay green when fully ripe. They have to be soft at the neck to enjoy them when they are most juicy. Some Comice may change color a little to more brownish yellow but the key to their most juicy flavor is when they give to slight thumb pressure at the neck (stem end).

What It Takes
Opal apples are a newer variety that we think will really take off.  They are a cross between Golden Delicious and Topaz. These are some of the first organic Opal apples grown in the U.S.  The trees were only planted 6 years ago.  Aside from the natural russeting around the stem and some tiny brown flecks, the skin is smooth, thick, and bright yellow, like a lemon. The white flesh underneath is crisp and juicy, with a resounding crunch, similar to a Honeycrisp. Flavor-wise, it’s quite sweet and slightly floral. They don’t brown easily after cutting so they are great to slice and enjoy or add to a salad.

The Stewart brothers provided these delicious Comice pears.  

This week’s Honeycrisp and Pink apples, and D’Anjou pears are from the Stennes family.

Health and Wellness
With Thanksgiving coming up we want to wish you a wonderful time of preparation and gratitude.  Remember to keep your body healthy during the stress of travel and colder days. Get plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables to replenish your body of essential vitamins and minerals. Some nutrients are drained more quickly when you are under stress, so eating healthy is especially important. Exercise is also a great way to combat stress. Physical activity relieves stress and aggression, plus releases endorphins into your system, which gives the feeling of happiness – the feeling some people call a “runner’s high.”

Recipe

Recipe #2 Apple Pear Kale Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette (a perfect early winter salad enjoy!)

Ingredients: 2 tablespoons champagne vinegar, 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, 1 tablespoon honey, 1 small shallot, minced, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, 1 pound lacinato kale, washed and dried, 1 honeycrisp or similar apple, thinly sliced, 1 D’Anjou or similar pear, 1/4 cup feta cheese, 1 small shallot, thinly sliced

Instructions: In a medium bowl or cup, whisk together the champagne vinegar, lemon juice, honey, shallot, salt, and pepper. Slowly drizzle the olive oil into the mixture while whisking to emulsify. Set aside. Remove the rib of each piece of kale. Cut the kale into thin strips, 1/4″ wide. Using your hands, squeeze the strips tightly to bruise. Pour the dressing over the kale and toss to coat. Allow to sit for at least 10 minutes before topping.  When the kale has marinated, add in the apple and pear slices, feta, and shallot. Toss to combine and serve immediately. Modified from a recipe from The Art of Simple                                                                                                            

 

Become a fan on Facebook (www.facebook.com/FruitShareOrganics), follow us on Twitter (www.twitter.com/FruitShare), pin us on Pinterest (www.pinterest.com/FruitShare) Good old-fashioned email works, too, at email hidden; JavaScript is required, or by phone at 651-644-2800

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Welcome to the 9th Fruit Delivery of 2018

Fruit Newsletter for Week 18, October 16th – 20th, 2018

Dear Angelic Organics shareholders with a fruit share, see below for the ninth fruit newsletter of the 2018 season from Everett Myers of FruitShare.

October Vol 3  2018

I would like to take a moment to thank you for being a part of FruitShare. We are honored to have your support and we do everything possible to find the best tasting organic fruit and deliver it to you, just days from harvest. Every day I try to pause and reflect and express my gratitude to my family, friends, co-workers and those I come in contact throughout the day. I’m not always successful, but when my focus and intention is on gratitude I know my day will be a great one.

Please know that we are here to support you in expressing your thanks and gratitude to those who make a difference in your life.  Again, thanks for your support of organic growers. Only through increased organic acreage can we reduce the amount of chemicals used in our farming systems and improve the health of the planet.


Enjoy the fruit your brain will thank you.  

Everett Myers, Founder and President of FruitShare™

In Your Box:  Honeycrisp apples, Pinova apples, Fuji apples, Asian pears, Bartlett pears, and Red D’Anjou pears  

Storage and Ripening
Keep the Green Bartlett, and Red D’Anjou pears on the counter. They will be ready to eat when they give to thumb pressure near the stem “check the neck”. These pears will take between 4-7 days to give to thumb pressure by the stem and then enjoy them.  To speed up their ripening process you can place some in a paper bag with a banana, but remember to check them every day. The banana gives off naturally, ethylene gas that ripens fruit faster. Once the pears give to thumb pressure you can place them in the refrigerator to enjoy them over a longer period of time.  

Your apples and Asian pears will keep for at least 2 weeks in the coldest part of your refrigerator.  They are ready to eat and are best enjoyed crisp.

What It Takes
Honeycrisp apples always a favorite.   We should have these consistently for the next 4 weeks. David Bedford of the University of Minnesota developed the Honeycrisp apples with good old-fashioned cross-breeding over 25 years ago.  It is the most popular apple we know of for eating fresh. It’s crisp sweet and tart combination along with the juicy crunch makes it a favorite. Bedford says that studied under an electron microscope, Honeycrisp cells are twice the size of other apples, which accounts for their unique, pleasing texture.  The cells fill up with natural sugar water which makes them delicious even to the core. We try to get you as many Honeycrisp as we can every year, but they are always limited and their season is short so enjoy them while they last. If you want more we do sell them by the straight box as well. They are great for eating out of hand but if you’re so inclined they make fantastic applesauce too.  Keep all your apples in the coolest part of your refrigerator to keep them crisp.

This week’s Honeycrisp, Pinova, and Fuji apples, Green Bartlett, Red D’Anjou and Asian pears are from the Stennes family.  Like many of our organic growers, the Stennes family farm in Washington’s Cascade Mountains is a family affair. The farm began in 1894, when the Stennes family emigrated from Norway and planted apple trees on their homestead. Now, Keith is joined by his twin sons, Mark and Kevin to make up the third and fourth generations of Stennes farmers.

These Asian pears, in my opinion, are what an Asian pear is supposed to be.  My daughter when she first tried one several years ago said, “it tastes like a juice box”.  You get the crisp of an apple and the sweet juice, of well, a juice box. In some parts of Asia, they are greatly appreciated as a symbol of beauty, longevity, and wisdom.  We got as much of this limited crop for you as we could and hope you will appreciate this gift.

Health and Wellness
Several recent studies are proving what we should already know: exercising is good for the brain – not just your body.  Recent research presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress show the brain-boosting effects of just four months of exercise. “It’s reassuring to know that you can at least partially prevent that [cognitive] decline by exercising and losing weight,” study researcher Dr. Martin Juneau, director of prevention of the Montreal Heart Institute, said in a statement. The study included overweight and sedentary adults with an average age of 49. They underwent twice-weekly sessions of intense interval training for four weeks, which included circuit weights and exercise bikes, before and after which they underwent tests of their cognitive functioning, cardiac output, body composition and exercise tolerance and capacity.  By the end of the study, the researchers found that not only were the participants’ body measurements all improved, but they also did better on the tests of cognitive functioning. “At least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per week can make a huge difference to manage risk factors for heart disease and stroke,” Dr. Beth Abramson, spokesperson for the Heart and Stroke Foundation, said in a statement. Think about it. 150 minutes per week equates to about 20 minutes of exercise a day to see real benefits.  There are many benefits of exercise. We know it can make us feel better. These studies suggest it can make us think better as well. Courtesy of huffingtonpost.com

Recipe

Roasted Beet Pear and Walnut Salad serves 3-4 sides, recipe courtesy of Jeanine Donofrio from Camillestyles.com blog

  • 3 medium-sized beets, any variety (I used a mix of red and golden beets)
  • a small drizzle of olive oil, for roasting the beets
  • 1 ripe pear, chopped into 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup walnuts, toasted
  • 1/4 cup feta cheese, crumbled (or more)
  • a few handfuls of salad greens of your choice
  • 1/4-1/2 cup cooked quinoa (optional, for a heartier salad)
  • micro sprouts, for garnish (also optional)
  • 1-2 tablespoons walnut oil
  • a drizzle of balsamic vinegar
  • a drizzle of honey
  • salt & pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Roast the beets by drizzling them with a bit of olive oil, some salt, and pepper, and wrapping them in foil. Depending on the size and freshness of your beets, they should take from 40 minutes to 1 hour to roast in the oven. Check occasionally, when they are fork-tender they are done. Set them aside to cool… as soon as they’re cool enough to touch, run them under the faucet and slide off the skins with your hands. Chop into roughly 1/2 inch cubes and set them aside to cool completely. (To save time, I suggest doing this up to one day ahead of time and popping them in the fridge until you’re ready to assemble the salad).  Assemble all salad ingredients on a platter. Drizzle with a liberal amount of walnut oil, a bit of balsamic vinegar, a little honey, and some salt and pepper. (or for a cleaner look, toss the balsamic only with the red beets, before assembling the salad).     

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